Deadly Chess Opening for Black Against 1.e4 [TRICKS & TRAPS]

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In this video lesson, GM Igor Smirnov shares with you an aggressive variation in one of the most popular chess openings, the Two Knights Defense.

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5, most of your opponents hope for the Fried Liver Attack which happens after 4…d5 5.exd5 Nxd5?! But instead of 5…Nxd5, there is a tricky variation called the Fritz Variation which happens after 5…Nd4.

This tricky variation comes with a lot of hidden traps that even strong players fall for. In most of the variations, Black is winning in just about 10 moves!

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► Chapters

00:00 Win Against 1.e4 in Only 10 Moves
00:18 Two Knights Defense, Fried Liver Attack
01:01 1.1) Fritz Variation, 5…Nd4
03:40 1.2) If White castles instead of Nxh8
05:14 2.1) If White plays Bxf7+ instead of Nxf7
07:03 2.2) If White plays Bb3 instead of Bc4
08:17 3) If White doesn’t play d6
10:47 Can you find the winning moves?
11:40 4) Stockfish recommendation for White

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92 Comments

  1. ► Chapters

    00:00 Win Against 1.e4 in Only 10 Moves

    00:18 Two Knights Defense, Fried Liver Attack

    01:01 1.1) Fritz Variation, 5…Nd4

    03:40 1.2) If White castles instead of Nxh8

    05:14 2.1) If White plays Bxf7+ instead of Nxf7

    07:03 2.2) If White plays Bb3 instead of Bc4

    08:17 3) If White doesn't play d6

    10:47 Can you find the winning moves?

    11:40 4) Stockfish recommendation for White

  2. GM Smirnov give very nice lessons, just like this one!…i use one of the principles he taught to show up mistake/s that a well known IM is making in a video of his here on youtube…he(that IM replied to me that i mustn't take things as philosophical and that i must rather use calculation!…i thanked him for his advice but i said i want to see for myself why i couldn't play a specific move i had in mind!…anyway long story short i did some analysis(with the help of an enjin) and i found that his whole video was based on flaws in his analysis so i posted my analysis on there in the comment section…but now he is as quiet as a mouse because the evidence is clear to see!!…i will post a link if somebody is interested🤠

  3. Excelente explicaciòn. Gracias.!!!

  4. Bishop take F3 rook take F3 rook + e1 queen x e1 then g2#

  5. Why did you make this video na, have been winning people since 2017 with this trap, lolz after Nxh8 i will tell my opponent to resign, most time it leads to the smothered mate

  6. For the puzzle, the cave man like 1. … Bxf3 is horrifying since 2.gxf3 fails to 2. … Qg1+ 3.Rxg1 Rxg1#, 2.Rxf3 fails to 2. … Re1+ 3.Qxe1 Qxg2# or 3.Rf1 Rxf1#, 2.Rg1fails to 2. … Bxg2+ 3.R or Qxg2 Qxg2+ 4.R or Qxg2 Re1+ 5.R or Qg1 Rxg1#, 2.Rf2 fails to Bxg2+ 3.Rxg2 Qxg2+ 4.Qxg2 Re1+ 5.Qg1 Rexg1# or 3.Kg1 Bh3+ 4.Kh1 Qg1#, and 2.h3 or h4 fails to 2. …Bxg2+ 3.Kh2 Qg3# or 3.Qxg2 Qxg2#. Now 2.Qg5 avoids mate but leads to a lost game after 2. … Bxg2+ 3.Kxg2 Qc6+ 4.Kh3 Rxg4 5.Bxg4 Bxb2 and Black wins overwhelming material.

  7. Be3 Qe2; Bxc1 …free piece. If Rook takes, Queen is dead.

  8. Love this opening! I have been attacked by the fried liver so many times. I usually play the standard defense.

  9. Thanks a lot for soo Good attack from black! 😊👍♟

  10. Bxf3 is the winning move.. If they take with the pawn, you have the checkmate after sacrificing the queen on g1 checkmate there..
    If they take with the rook, you go with Te1 for the check.. Taking with the queen is checkmate with Qxg2 putting the rook in between is checkmate by taking the rook.
    White could also play after Bxf3, Qg5 but that looses to Bxg2 , Kxg2 and Qc6 giving check and pinning the queen with the rook.

  11. thank you for these videos.. on my way to become a chess legend

  12. Bxf3, then either Rxf3, Re1+, Qe1, Qg2#, or gxf3, Qg1+, Rxg1, Rxg1#

  13. For puzzle: Bxf3 wins I think.

    If G pawn takes, …Qg2 Rxg2, …Rxg2#

    If rook takes, …Re1+ Qxe1, …Qxg2#

    If ignored (e.g. any move by white except queen trade), Bxg2# unless white queen takes bishop on d4, then Qg2#

    Finally if Qg5 offering queen trade, I’m not sure how to cohesively force mate but maybe something like …Bxg2+, Kxg2 …Qxg5+, Bxg5 …Rxg5+, Kh1 …Bxb2 and wins rook

    Edit: spent 10 minutes big braining this on the toilet before reading the other comments

  14. Attack queen with dark squared bishop backed by the rook

  15. great lesson. worked like a charm today. thanks for your help. keep up with the great videos

  16. never attempting a fried liver attack again after watching this

  17. bxf3 is forced mate. Although I didn't know that until the Engine told me, I probably would've played it anyways (I like to play sacrifices in attacks regardless if they're good or not). It's mate in 6 after, with gxf3, qg5, (and here we don't trade queens to win a bishop, we keep applying pressure) qd3, (here white can't defend the rook capture checkmate and the queen so they sac the queen) nd2 (trying to hold the position barely and activate the knight and rook for the futile defense), rxg5 (we take the queen), rg1 (barricading the king), (and instead of capturing the rook and luring the king out, we play another move because if we captured the rook, white could instead of recapturing the bishop activate the knight, and even tho it's still forced mate, it went from mate in 3 to mate in 6) bxg2+, rxg2 (forced move), re1+ (adding a rook in play to add even more pressure), nf1, rxf1+/qxf1+, qf1# (there's about 3 or 4 different ways to checkmate the guy after).

    However, opponents won't play that, they'll either resign, or they'll capture gxf3 (which loses in 2), qg1+, rxg1, rxg1# (just a forced mate down the board).

    Or they'll take the bishop with the rook thinking the queen covers back rank mate (which it does, but it can't defend everything) rxf3, re1+, qxe1, qxg2#

    Basically, you have too much pressure. White Is trying to stop two bishops, two rooks and a queen with a rook and queen. The other pieces cannot be adequately developed in time to defend all the pressure, the attack is too imminent. It's either forced mate in 6, or practically mate in 3, although you can get fancy with it and checkmate them how you want, either way (unless you blunder RIDICULOUSLY) they can't defend it at all.

  18. I think the winning idea for the puzzle is Bxf3. Dont think it's defendable by any means

  19. To the question at 10.56: blacks white bishop takes on f3! If white takes with pawn its mate by Queen g1, foĺlowed by the rook (defended by bishop), if white rook takes, its rook geting on whites first rank, also leading to mate. If rook g1 to defend without taking the bishop, the other black bishop first takes the rook, after that g2 falls and mate is coming!

  20. Hello GM Igor, if I may, you want to teach the majority of your followers some cool chess, nice, very thankfull. However, what's about making videoS if you can, if you're capable of teaching the 1000, 1200, 1500, 1800 ELO something to improve. As a Grand Master, you may not be thinking as low level chess players but as a very talanted player and that's fine. It's very difficult to teach lower players than you, because you know and you think they must know as mush as you. Lately, I have been watching your videos on different tricks and traps, and believe me, each move from the opponent on let say the Bishop opening can be chalanging and different that of all your explanations. I personely don't want to memorise moves but to know how to play it at ease with confidence. Stay safe.

  21. In the final position, … Bxf3! wins by force: the threat is …bxg2+, so White must respond, but if 2. gxf3, Qg1+!, 3. Rxg1, Rxg1#. If 2. Rxf3, Re1+!, 3. Qxe1, Qxg2# (of course, if 3. Rf1, Rxf1#).

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