How grandmasters study chess openings

This week we gave some very lucky members of the Chess.com community a chance to try out our new Classroom feature with the one and only GM Fabiano Caruana!

Watch the full lesson:

#chess #caruana #classroom

10 Comments

  1. As a nobody whos just starting up the why seems important because the opposing team isn't going to always play what's predicted and being strictly analytical is almost trapping yourself if you understand as the opposing force that someone is playing the tactic and not the board and that whites winning because the access to the queen opens up earlier even if it's not played till midgame having that backup can be crucial and if black wanted to open up their queen after a board like this advancing the pawns in this fashion risks breaking up the structure and that a passive attack on the center followed by a flank would be better to otherwise avoid the direct attack but that being said im a nobody trying to learn what I can it can also ve noted that playing the person can also be a good thing something i know is a good thing and yet have extensive trouble bringing to the board

  2. He didn't really answer the questions.

  3. A powerful technique all the top memory competitors use is called memory palace.

    This technique is well suited for memorizing all the specific move orders but like they mentioned the strategic understanding comes separate.

    Realizing memorizing moves and understanding openings aren’t mutually exclusive is a big step. Many just love the dogma “learn your openings don’t memorize them” when in fact both skills are separately valuable.

  4. Tani typing in chat that he has school is so funny for some reason

  5. Bro who are these 1000s getting coached by Fabi 😭

  6. This was fascinating and enlightening. Thank you for this.

  7. "we don't remember half of it and the other half we don't understand" !! – I love that – coming from this all time great player

  8. This conversation is enlightening. I kinda paused on systems like London, Colle, KIA, KID, etc. I sometimes instinctively move to a certain square without even analyzing the board. Understanding the "why" is a really good advice, I stepped back a bit and I just play fundamentally sound chess, not concentrating on the opening and their lines. I actually find it a bit liberating.

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